March 13 - 31, 2020 · AMOLF · Cancellation Public Colloquia March

All AMOLF Public Colloquia in March are cancelled as precautionary measure against the spread of coronavirus

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Research fields

Using the tools of physics and design principles, AMOLF researchers study complex matter, such as light at the nanoscale, living matter, designer matter and nanoscale solar cells. These insights open up opportunities to create new functional materials and to find solutions to societal challenges.

Explore the AMOLF research themes
  • The strength of collagen

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  • ERC Advanced Grant for Pieter Rein ten Wolde

    Today the European Research Council (ERC) announced that 185 scientists receive an Advanced Grant of 2.5 million euros. One of them is AMOLF group leader Pieter Rein ten Wolde. He …

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  • Topology protects light propagation in photonic crystal

    Researchers of AMOLF and TU Delft have seen light propagate in a special material without it suffering from reflections. The material, a photonic crystal, consists of two parts that each …

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  • Licht gaat ongehinderd de hoek om: topologie beschermt lichtgeleiding in fotonisch kristal

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Researchers discover new mechanism for the coexistence of species

Researchers from AMOLF  and Harvard University (USA) show how the ability of organisms to move around plays a role in stabilizing ecosystems. In their paper published 19 February 2020 in Nature, they describe how the competition between ‘movers’ and ‘growers’ leads to a balance in which both types of bacteria can continue to exist alongside each other.

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Vibrations on a chip feel a magnetic field
Using light to couple the strings of a nanoscopic guitar

AMOLF physicists have made mechanical vibrations on a chip behave as if they were electrical currents flowing in a magnetic field. Because of their charge, electrons are influenced by magnetic fields, which curve their trajectories. Sound waves or more precisely the propagating mechanical vibrations don’t feel a magnetic field, because they don’t carry charge. By illuminating strings with laser light the researchers have found a way to make mechanical vibrations hop from one nanoscale string to another. Thus, these vibrations behave like electrons in a magnetic field. This unlocks new ways to manipulate sound waves and the information they can carry on chips.

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