April 21, 2023 · AMOLF · REGISTRATION IS OPEN NOW! 

Autonomous Matter Symposium 2023

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Research fields

Using the tools of physics and design principles, AMOLF researchers study complex matter, such as light at the nanoscale, living matter, designer matter and nanoscale solar cells. These insights open up opportunities to create new functional materials and to find solutions to societal challenges.

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  • ERC Consolidator grant for Ewold Verhagen

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  • Mathematics at the speed of light

    Researchers at AMOLF, University of Pennsylvania, and City University of New York (CUNY) created a nanostructured surface capable of solving equations using light. This discovery opens exciting new opportunities in …

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  • Kristina Ganzinger member of De Jonge Akademie

    The KNAW has selected ten new members for ‘De Jonge Akademie’, one of which is AMOLF group leader Kristina Ganzinger (Physics of Cellular Interactions). Members of ‘De Jonge Akademie’ are …

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  • Daughter cells in the intestine do what their mother tells them

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Highlight

Floppy or not: artificial intelligence predicts properties of complex metamaterials

Given a 3D piece of origami, can you flatten it without damaging it? Just by looking at the design, the answer is hard to predict, because each and every fold in the design has to be compatible with the flattening process. This is an example of a combinatorial problem. New research led by the University of Amsterdam and AMOLF has demonstrated that machine learning algorithms can accurately and efficiently answer these kinds of questions. This is expected to give a boost to the artificial intelligence-assisted design of complex and functional (meta)materials.

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Highlight

Regular patterns – like those found in nature – now also produced in the lab

AMOLF researchers have found a new method for producing layered materials. Inspired by nature, they developed a physical-chemical process that yields highly regular microstructures. They describe this in a paper that was published in the journal PNAS. It offers the prospect of a relatively simple way to manufacture advanced, functional materials. Furthermore, the research can help us to better understand the genesis of natural patterns.

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