October 15, 2018 · AMOLF Lecture Room · Jacco van Rheenen (Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam)

In vivo imaging of migration and metastasis

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Research fields

Using the tools of physics and design principles, AMOLF researchers study complex matter, such as light at the nanoscale, living matter, designer matter and nanoscale solar cells. These insights open up opportunities to create new functional materials and to find solutions to societal challenges.

Explore the AMOLF research themes
  • Light multiplication for stable improvement of solar cells

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  • Licht splitsen voor stabiele verbetering van zonnecellen

    Door een lichtdeeltje met hoge energie te splitsen in twee deeltjes met lagere energie, maakt singlet-splijting hoog-energetische fotonen beschikbaar voor zonnecellen. Aangezien zonnecellen gebaseerd op silicium hun rendementslimiet bijna hebben …

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  • Self-folding metamaterial

    The more complex the object, the harder it is to fold up. Space satellites often need many small motors to fold up an instrument, and people have difficulty simply folding …

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  • Metamateriaal vouwt zichzelf op

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Read more news articles

Highlight

Physicists catch light in the eye of the storm
June 4, 2018

Stillness rules the eye of a hurricane; without a hurricane no eye, and without an eye no hurricane. In a similar manner, physicists of research institute AMOLF, the University of Amsterdam and the University of Texas at Austin, have captured light in the eye of an optical vortex. “The light could move in any direction but does not do so,” says researcher Hugo Doeleman. The research was published on June 4th in the top journal Nature Photonics.

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Highlight

From sea urchin skeleton to semiconductor
June 4, 2018

Researchers at AMOLF have found a way of making calcium carbonate structures, such as a sea urchin skeleton, suitable for use in electronics. They do this by modifying the composition of the material so that it becomes a semiconductor without losing its shape. This research was published in the journal Nature Chemistry on June 4th 2018.

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AMOLF NEWS magazine

  • Interview: AMOLF director Huib Bakker about ‘the magic of AMOLF’
  • Highlight: from sea urchin skeleton to semiconductor
  • News: vidi grant for Wim Noorduin
  • International prizes for AMOLF group leaders
  • New materials for sustainable energy

 

 

Click here to read the latest issue of July 2018 (Dutch)